Under the immigration laws of the United States, an individual who applies for an immigrant visa abroad, or who seeks permanent residency while in the United States, must undergo a medical examination to establish that they are free from any conditions that would render them inadmissible on health-related grounds.

Effective October 1, 2021, in addition to the current list of mandatory inoculations, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) mandates that applicants must also demonstrate completion of a COVID-19 vaccination series (one or two doses, depending on the vaccine) to the panel physician or civil surgeon performing the medical evaluation. According to the CDC, the following constitute acceptable proof of vaccination: (1) an official vaccination record, or (2) a copy of a medical chart with entries made by a physician or other appropriate medical personnel. Absent this documentation, the panel physician or civil surgeon may agree to administer the vaccine to the applicant to meet this requirement.


Continue Reading New COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement for Immigrants

Chile continues suspending the entry of foreign nationals due to the outbreak of Coronavirus until July 25, 2021. Exemptions have been carved out, including specific procedures for companies to apply for a a safe conduct (“Salvoconducto”) to allow entry to the country for essential or critical personnel.
Continue Reading Chile Continues Banning Entry of Foreign Nationals and Placing Restrictions for Exit

Taiwan continues suspending the entry of visitors and resident visa holders until July 16.  Only foreign nationals with an Alien Resident Certificate are permitted to enter. Exceptions are being considered on a case-by-case basis for emergencies and on humanitarian grounds.


Continue Reading In Response to Rising COVID-19 Cases, Taiwan Continues Banning Foreign Nationals

The limit on the number of international arrivals coming into Australia via commercial flights, the so-called “passenger cap”, will be halved from July 14 due to concerns around the Delta variant of Covid-19.  The new cap will be 3,035 international arrivals per week, and each major airport will be subject to these caps:

  • Sydney: 1,505 per week
  • Perth: 265 per week
  • Adelaide: 265 per week
  • Melbourne: 500 per week
  • Brisbane: 500 per week (plus 150 surge capacity)


Continue Reading Decrease in Australia’s Incoming Passenger Cap

In response to COVID-19 outbreaks, some Australian states and territories have enacted new restrictions and closed their borders. These restrictions include mandatory quarantines, COVID-19 tests, and the completion of either declaration or registration forms. Australia has remained closed to international travelers, unless you are an Australia citizen, resident, immediate family member, or meet a specified exemption. If returning home to Australia or if an exception is met, travelers from oversees, with the exception of travelers from New Zealand who meet eligibility criteria, are required to quarantine at their port of arrival for 14 days at a government-designated accommodation.

Continue Reading COVID-19 Outbreaks Cause Border Closures and New Travel Restrictions Across Australia

On July 6, 2021, the Department of State extended the validity of National Interest Exceptions (NIE) for travelers subject to restrictions under the COVID-19 travel bans (Presidential Proclamations 9984, 9992, 10143, and 10199).  Unless otherwise indicated, existing NIEs will be valid for 12 months from the date of approval and for multiple entries, as long as they are used for the purpose under which they were granted.

Continue Reading State Department Extends Validity of National Interest Exceptions

The official 30 June deadline to submit an initial application under the EU Settlement Scheme (“EUSS”) has now passed.  There were a flurry of last minute applications and reports of people being unable to submit their applications due to technical difficulties caused by the number of people logging onto the on-line form.  There is a significant backlog of applications and some applications have yet to arrive with the Home Office as they had to be submitted by post.  Fortunately, whilst an application is pending, an applicant continues to have the right to live and work in the UK.

Whilst the deadline for applications has come and gone, there may still be hope for some who may not have managed to submit an application in time.


Continue Reading Closure Of The EU Settlement Scheme – Not Quite The End . . . Yet

In an eagerly anticipated update, the Home Office has now announced that the Covid-19 adjustment to the right to work (“RTW”) check will no longer end on 20 June 2021 but will be extended to 1 September 2021.

The RTW check seems to be the most frequently changing area of UK immigration law at present

The Home Office has finally published its revised Code of Practice on Preventing Illegal Working (the “draft Code”) covering the changes to the right to work check requirements for EEA citizens which come into effect on 1 July 2021.

In this article, we look at the changes that the draft Code introduces, how this will affect UK employers and the areas of continued uncertainty.


Continue Reading UK Government Publishes 1 July Right To Work Guidance

Starting May 3, South Korea implemented the Korea Electronic Travel Authorization (K-ETA) pilot program, an optional system for foreign nationals from 21 visa-exempt countries, including the United States. In April, the South Korean Ministry of Justice confirmed the pilot program would continue until August, after which the program would become mandatory for visa-exempt foreign nationals in September 2021.

Continue Reading South Korea Will Mandate Electronic Travel Authorizations for Foreign Travelers Beginning in September