The Government of India has not yet eased its ban on international flights or consular processing services.  The latest announcement from the Government confirms:

  • All scheduled international commercial passenger services will remain closed until July 15, 2020, with exceptions for select routes for which international flights may be permitted made on a case-by-case basis.
  • All

Effective May 27, 2020 at midnight Japan time, the Japanese government will ban the entry of foreigners who have visited India, Argentina, South Africa or eight other countries for the past 14 days prior to arriving in Japan.  On May 22, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs had placed a Level 3 travel warning level on

Automatic Extensions Benefiting Foreign Nationals

The United Arab Emirates (“UAE”) Cabinet has approved certain new decisions in relation to the extension of several existing permits as the country steps up precautionary measures to contain the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Continue Reading New COVID-19 Measures by the United Arab Emirates

Following the March 11, 2020 “Proclamation on the Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Certain Additional Persons Who Pose a Risk of Transmitting Coronavirus,” which suspends travel from the 26 Schengen countries in Europe, the White House has expanded the ban’s coverage to include the United Kingdom and Ireland.  The March 14, 2020 Proclamation is based on World Health Organization reports on the growing number of COVID-19 cases in both countries.  Effective Monday, March 16, 2020, travelers who have been physically present in the United Kingdom or Ireland in the prior 14-day period will not be admitted to the United States.  US citizens are not subject to the Proclamation. 
Continue Reading US Travel Ban Expanded to Include the United Kingdom and Ireland

On Wednesday evening, March 11, 2020, President Trump announced a ban on travel from Europe to the United States for 30 days, a sweeping new measure that will take effect on at midnight on Friday, March 13, 2020.  Travel from the United Kingdom will be exempt from the ban, and there will be exceptions for Americans who have undergone health screenings.  Currently, Americans entering from banned countries, such as China and Iran, are required to enter through designated airports, so they may undergo health screenings and, if needed, quarantine procedures.
Continue Reading President Trump Announces 30-day Suspension of Travel from Europe Due to Coronavirus

According to media reports, President Trump, speaking to reporters ahead of a meeting with health researchers on March 2, 2020, indicated the United States will consider extension of travel restrictions beyond the People’s Republic of China and Iran.  The president said the administration has been “very stringent,” but is now looking at “other countries that have been badly affected.”  He cited Italy, Japan, and South Korea as “hot spots” under close review. 
Continue Reading US Travel Ban May Expand to “Hot Spots” Abroad

In a 5-4 decision issued on Tuesday, June 26, 2018, the US Supreme Court upheld the president’s broad statutory authority to suspend the issuance of visas to nationals of certain countries in the interests of national security. Finding the September 24, 2017, Proclamation 9645 (“Proclamation”) to be neutral on its face, the Court rejected the arguments of the State of Hawaii that the ban was a thinly veiled attempt to ban Muslims from the United States in violation of the Establishment Clause of the US Constitution and the Immigration and Nationality Act (“INA”).

“By its plain language, [the INA] grants the president broad discretion to suspend the entry of aliens into the United States,” the majority opinion, authored by Chief Justice John Roberts, states. “The president lawfully exercised that discretion based on his findings—following a worldwide, multiagency review—that entry of the covered aliens would be detrimental to the national interest. And plaintiffs’ attempts to identify a conflict with other provisions in the INA, and their appeal to the statute’s purposes and legislative history, fail to overcome the clear statutory language.”

Continue Reading Supreme Court Upholds Trump’s Third Travel Ban

On March 27, 2018, ten former officials from the US Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security, Immigration and Naturalization Service, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Department of Health and Human Services filed an amicus brief to the Supreme court challenging the government’s misplaced reliance of the “presumption of regularity” in the Trump Travel Ban


On Tuesday, April 10, 2018, President Donald Trump announced that restrictions on travel would be lifted for citizens of Chad, one of eight countries included in the third version of the administration’s controversial travel ban.   In doing so, the president cited improvement in Chad’s identity-management and information sharing practices. Originally announced on September 24, 2017 in the “Presidential Proclamation Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats,” Travel Ban 3.0 imposed restrictions on travel for nationals of Chad and seven other countries: Iran, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Syria, Venezuela, and Yemen.   Mayer Brown’s Legal Advisory in September 2017 addresses the precise restrictions on each of the countries.
Continue Reading President Lifts Travel Ban 3.0 for Chad, But Seven Other Countries Remain Barred