On November 1, 2021, the Department of Labor (DOL) found that labor shortages resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic do not qualify as a “one-time occurrence” justifying the hiring of H-2B temporary workers.  The H-2B program allows U.S. employers to hire foreign workers to fill temporary non-agricultural positions in the United States. Before hiring an H-2B worker, the employer must file an application with DOL. In particular, the employer must demonstrate that a “temporary” need for foreign workers exists due to: (1) a one-time occurrence; (2) the seasonal nature of the business; (3) a short-term spike in demand (i.e., a peak load); or (4) the intermittent nature of the work.
Continue Reading DOL Finds that Pandemic is not Sufficiently “Temporary” for H-2B Program

On November 1, 2021, Taiwan’s Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) announced that entry restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic will continue through at least February 14, 2022. Under the CECC restrictions, arriving passengers are required to quarantine for 14 days following arrival, and to complete a 7-day self-health management period after the end of quarantine.

Continue Reading Taiwan Entry Restrictions Extended Through February 2022

On October 30, 2021, the Chilean government announced another extension of the country’s border closure due to COVID-19, effective through November 30, 2021. However, the extension comes with important modifications to the country’s “Protected Borders Plan,” including relaxed quarantine requirements for vaccinated travelers and the addition of the Punta Arenas airport for international travel.

Continue Reading Chile Extends COVID-Related Entry & Exit Restrictions

Effective November 8, 2021, the Biden Administration will rescind the COVID-19 travel restrictions banning most travel from Europe, Brazil, India, China, Iran, and South Africa.  In its place, the Administration will impose new COVID-19 prevention protocols on all international air travelers, including those coming from countries not previously impacted by the COVID-19 travel bans.  On October 25, 2021, the White House provided specific operational details describing how the program will be implemented and who will — and will not — be impacted by the new rules. 
Continue Reading U.S. Announces Operational Details for Replacement of Travel Bans with Vaccine Mandate on November 8

In order to reduce the spread of COVID-19, many countries have imposed both inbound and outbound restrictions on international travel. These restrictions can affect the ability of foreign national residents to reenter their host countries after even brief trips abroad. With the holidays approaching, resident foreign nationals who wish to travel outside their host countries must plan well in advance to ensure compliance with all departure and reentry requirements. Failure to do so could negatively affect their immigration status.

Continue Reading COVID-Related Departure and Reentry Requirements: Plan Ahead for International Travel

On October 15, 2021, the Biden Administration confirmed that it will rescind the COVID-19 travel restrictions banning most travel from Europe, Brazil, India, China, Iran, and South Africa effective November 8, 2021.  In its place, the Administration will impose new COVID-19 prevention protocols on all international air travelers, including those coming from countries not previously impacted by the COVID-19 travel bans.

Continue Reading U.S. to Replace Travel Bans with Vaccine Mandates on November 8th

On October 12, 2021, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that it will reopen the U.S. land borders with Mexico and Canada for non-essential travel for vaccinated travelers.  Non-essential travel includes tourism and family visits.  Land and ferry crossings from Canada and Mexico have been closed to non-essential travel since March 2020.    DHS indicated that this policy change will align land border crossings with the new international air travel COVID-19 prevention protocols to be implemented in November 2021. Accordingly, it does not appear as if U.S. citizens will be required to be vaccinated to enter the U.S. from Canada or Mexico.  Similar to the the new rules for international air travel, DHS has not announced a specific day in November that the land borders with Canada and Mexico would be reopened for non-essential travel.

Continue Reading US to Reopen Border with Mexico and Canada

On October 8, 2021, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced which vaccines will be acceptable for travel to the U.S. once the Biden Administration lifts the COVID-19 travel bans.  This follows the Administration’s September 20th announcement that it will rescind the COVID-19 travel restrictions banning most travel from Europe, Brazil, India, China, Iran, and South Africa.  In its place, the Administration signaled it would replace the bans with a vaccine mandate for most foreign international air travelers, including those coming from countries not previously impacted by the COVID-19 travel bans.  The Administration, however, has not stated which vaccines would be accepted until now.

Continue Reading CDC Announces Vaccines Acceptable for U.S. Travel

Chile’s Ministry of the Interior and Public Security announced an extension to the country’s border closure, due to COVID-19, to remain in place until October 31, 2021, as well as some modifications to the previously announced “Protected Borders Plan”.

Continue Reading Chile Extends Border Closures and Exit Restrictions, With Some Exceptions

On October 1, 2021, the Australian government announced that it expects to begin lifting pandemic-related travel restrictions for fully vaccinated Australian citizens and permanent residents as soon as November. Australia’s move follows the U.S. government’s announcement on September 20 that it would replace its current international travel bans with a new set of vaccination and testing mandates for foreign nationals traveling to the United States.

Continue Reading Australia Looks to Ease Travel Restrictions in November